16th March 1952… This Week in Religion, America’s first religious television program, debuts on the Dumont Television Network. Of the early religious offerings on TV, it is the only ecumenical program and airs on Sunday nights for more than two years.

15th March 1587 … Death of Caspar Olevianus, early German theologian and reformer. He introduced the Calvinist Reformation into parts of Germany and was a founder of the German Reformed Church.

14th March 1644 … Roger Williams is granted a colonial patent by the English Parliament to found Rhode Island, the first American colony where the freedom to worship God was separated from the control of the state.

13th March 1456 … German printer Johann Gutenberg completes publication of the Bible on his printing press. It is the first copy of the scriptures produced with movable type.

12th March 1607 … Birth of German hymn writer Paul Gerhardt, author of “O Sacred Head, Now Wounded”.

11th March 1847 … Death of Jonathan Chapman, the American pioneer and horticultural evangelist better known as “Johnny Appleseed”. Chapman’s “nature theology” derived from his Swedenborgian beliefs and he travelled throughout the Midwest, preaching and distributing apple seeds.

10th March 1880 … English evangelist, writer, and missionary George Scott Railton, along with seven women, lands in New York City from London and inaugurates the first mission of the Salvation Army in the United States.

9th March 1931 … Clarence W. Jones and Reuben Larson incorporate the World Radio Missionary Fellowship in Lima, Ohio. It would become one of the widest-reaching radio ministries, broadcasting the gospel in many countries.

8th March 1887 … Death of Henry Ward Beecher, American Congressional clergyman, abolitionist, orator, and writer. The brother of Harriet Beecher Stowe, Beecher’s dramatic flair made him a leading spokesman for tough social issues of the day.

7th March 1825 … Birth of Alfred Edersheim, Jewish-born Anglican Bible scholar, theologian , and writer. His most widely read title, The Life and Times of Jesus the Messiah (1883) is still in print.

6th March 1475 … Birth of Michelangelo Buonarroti, Italian artist extraordinaire. Michelangelo’s most famous works include the sculptures Pieta’ (1498) and David  (1504), the architectural plans for rebuilding St. Peter’s Cathedral in Rome, and the paintings on the 5,808 square-foot ceiling of the Sistine Chapel (1508-12)

5th March 1743 … In the midst of the Great Awakening, clergyman Thomas Prince, an avid collector of colonial historical records, publishes The Christian History, America’s first religious magazine.

4th March 1791 … The Reverend John Hurt is appointed as the first chaplain in U.S. Army history. Hurt had previously served as chaplain of the Sixth Virginia Infantry during the American Revolution.

3rd March 1865 … Congress approves U.S Treasury Secretary Salmon P. Chase’s mandate to the U.S mint to prepare a device with which to inscribe the motto “In God We Trust” on U.S. coins.

2nd March 1930 … American missionary Gustav Herbert Schmidt (1891 – 1958) opens the Danzig Instytut Biblijny in the Free City of Danzig. It is the first Pentecostal Bible institute established in Eastern Europe.

1st March 1692 … In colonial Massachusetts, the Salem witch trials begin with the conviction of West Indian slave  Tituba for witchcraft.

28th February 1784 … English churchman John Wesley charters a movement within Anglicanism that comes to be known as Methodism.

27th February 1847 … The Reverend John L. Lenhart is commissioned as chaplain of the U.S. Navy. In 1862 Chaplain Lenhart became the first U.S Navy chaplain to be killed in action, when the Confederate ironclad Merrimac sank the Union frigate Cumberland off Hampton Roads, Virginia.

26th February 1732 … In Philadelphia Mass is celebrated for the first time at St. Joseph’s Church, the only Roman Catholic church built and maintained in the American colonies before the American Revolutionary War. The service is led by the Reverend Joseph Greaton.

25th February 1913 … Pioneer missionary Eduard L. Arndt arrives in Shanghai, China, ten months after founding the Evangelical Lutheran Missions for China. Arndtlater established mission schools in the Hankow territory and translated hymns and sermons into Chinese.

24th February 1902 … Birth of English missionary Gladys Aylward. The award-winning 1958 film Inn of the Sixth Happiness (starring Ingrid Bergman) was based on Aylward’s life and work among the Chinese (1932-48)

23rd February 1982 … The U.S Supreme Court rules that members of the Old Order Amish Church who operate businesses must pay Social Security and unemployment taxes, despite their religious belief that paying taxes is a sin.

22nd February 1906 … Louisa-born Baptist evangelist William J. Seymour arrives in Los Angeles and begins holding evangelistic meetings at the Apostolic Faith Mission, located at 312 Azusa Street. The Azusa Street Revival soon breaks out under Seymour’s leadership and becomes one of the landmark events in the history of twentieth century American Pentecostalism.

21st February 1945 … Death of Eric Liddell, Scottish Olympic champion runner and missionary to China. Liddell’s college running days are portrayed in the 1981 film Chariots of Fire.

20th February 1743 … Colonial missionary to the American Indians David Brainerd writes in his journal, “Selfish religion loves Christ for his benefits, but not for himself.”

19th February 1812 … Congregational missionaries Adoniram  and Ann Judson set sail from New England for Calcutta, India. For their subsequent work in Burma, they became two of the most famous American missionaries of their day.

18th February 1546 … Death of Martin Luther, German Augustinian priest and reformer. In 1517 Luther symbolically inaugurated the Protestant Reformation and remained its leader until his death. Luther also translated the Bible into German and penned the hymn “A Mighty Fortress.”

17th February 1889 … Billy Sunday, baseball player turned preacher, makes his first appearance as an evangelist in Chicago. Sunday preaches Fundamentalism, supports temperance, and opposes scientific evolution. More than 100 million people would hear him preach in his lifetime.

16th February 1865 … English clergyman Sabine Baring-Gould publishes “Now the Day is Over,” a hymn based on the text of Proverbs 3:24.

15th February 1905 … Death of Lewis Wallace, American Civil War soldier and author of Ben-Hur: A tale of the Christ (1880), The Boyhood of Christ (1888), and Lew Wallace: An Autobiography (1906).

14th February 1985 … The U.S Rabbinical Assembly of Conservative Judaism announces its decision to begin accepting women as Rabbis.

13th February 1919 … Birth of Ernest Jennings “Tennessee Ernie” Ford, Christian country entertainer. Ford hosted his own television program (1955-65) but is best remembered for the many sacred musical recordings he made during his career.

12th February 1644 … Birth of Jacob Ammann, Mennonite minister from Alsace/Switzerland and founder of the Amish Mennonites.

11th February 1790 …The Society of Friends (Quakers) presents a petition to the American Congress calling for the abolition of slavery.

10th February 1929 … In London F.B Meyer preaches his last sermon. The renowned Baptist clergyman and devotional author died on March 28.

9th February 1914 … Birth of Bruce Manning Metzger, American Presbyterian New Testament scholar. Metzger taught at Princeton University (1938 -1984) and was a member of the Revised Standard Version Bible translation committee.

8th February 1693 … The College of William and Mary is founded in Williamsburg, Virginia, for the purpose of educating Anglican clergymen. It is the second – oldest institution of higher learning in America, after Harvard.

7th February 1528 … The Swiss canton of Bern officially embraces the Protestant faith of reformers Ulrich Zwingli and John Oecolampadius.

6th February 1924 … Radio station  KFSG (Kall Four Square Gospel) goes on the air. One of the earliest licensed radio stations, KFSG broadcasts the services of Angelus Temple, the flagship congregation of the International Foursquare Gospel Church, founded in 1923 by Aimee Semple Mc Pherson.

5th February 1631 … English-born clergyman Roger Williams arrives in America. He soon begins questioning Massachusetts’ religious policies that fuse church and state matters. Banished to Rhode Island five years later, he established the first Baptist church in America in providence.

4th February 1874 … English poet and devotional writer Frances Ridley Havergal pens the words to the popular hymn of commitment “Take My Life and Let It Be”.

3rd February 1985 … In South Africa Desmond Tutu becomes Johannesburg’s first black Anglican bishop. A trained ecumenist, Tutu later becomes archbishop of Capetown and Anglican primate of South Africa.

2nd February 1881 … The first formal church youth organization is established in the Williston Congregational Church in Portland , Maine, by the Reverend Francis E. Clark. Originally called Christian Endeavour, it becomes the forerunner of denominational youth fellowships in modern churches.

1st February 1909 … Birth of George Beverley Shea, Canadian born music evangelist, who sang at many of the Billy Graham Crusades from the 1950s through the 1970s.

31st January 1949 … American missionary Jim Elliot concludes in his journal, “One does not surrender a life in an instant – that which is lifelong can only be surrendered in a lifetime.”

30th January 1536 … Parish priest Menno Simons leaves the Catholic Church over his doubts about transubstantiation. He converts to the Anabaptist faith and leads a group of followers who eventually come to be called Mennonites.

29th January 1499 … Birth of Katherine von Bora, the former German nun who married Martin Luther. Born into a noble family, Katherine became a Cistercian nun in 1515 but ran away from the convent in 1523 and married Luther in 1525.

28th January 1916 … Louis Brandeis is appointed to the U.S Supreme Court in Washington D.C. He is the first Jewish associate justice.

27th January 417 … Pelagius, a British monk whose teachings are declared heretical, is excommunicated by Pope Innocent I. Pelagius’s doctrine denies original sin and teaches that one could become righteous by the exercise of free will.

26th January 1905 … Birth of Maria Augusta von Trapp, Austrian-American musician who fled Nazi-occupied Austria in the 1930’s and formed the world famous Trapp family singers. Her story is the subject of the award winning 1965 film The Sound of Music.

25th January 1944 … Florence Tim-Oi Li is ordained as a priest at Shie Hing in Kwangtung Province, China, as an emergency wartime measure due to the lack of male priests in Macao, making her the first female Anglican clergy-person.

24th January 1959 … The Reverend Barbara C. Harris of Boston is confirmed as the first  female bishop in the history of the Church of England.

23rd January 1955 … The United Presbyterian Church U.S.A. formally approves the ordination of women as clergy, making it the first mainline Protestant denomination to do so.

22nd January 1899 … Pope Leo XIII publishes “Testem benevolentiae” . Addressed to James Gibbons, cardinal archbishop of Baltimore, the letter is remembered primarily for the Vaticans condemnation of  “Americanism” – the adaptation of Roman Catholic doctrine to the more independent ideologies of modern civilization, represented primarily by the American Character.

21st January 1886 … Death of Laura Maria Sheldon Wright, American missionary to the Seneca Indians in western New York.

20th January 1669 … Birth of Susannah (Annesley) Wesley, wife of clergyman Samuel Wesley and mother of nineteen children, including John and Charles Wesley, the founders of Methodism.

19th January 1798 … Birth of Samuel Austin Worcester, American Congregational missionary to the Cherokee Indians in Georgia and Arkansas.

18th January 1815 … Birth of German theologian and textual scholar L.F. Konstantin von Tischendorf, who is remembered in scholarly circles for discovering and deciphering the Codex Sinaiticus, an important fifth century Greek manuscript of the Pauline Epistles.

17th January 1970 … John M. Burgess is installed as Bishop of the Protestant Episcopal diocese of Massachusetts, making him the first African-American Bishop to head an Episcopal diocese in America

16th January 1604 … At the Hampton Court Conference in London, Puritan John Rainolds suggests to King James I “that there might be a new translation of the Bible, as consonant as can be to the original Hebrew and Greek.” James grants his approval, and the ensuing project leads to the 1611 publication of the Authorized (King James) version of the Bible.

15th January 1535 … The Act of Supremacy is passed, in which King Henry VIII declares himself “Protector and Only Supreme Head of the Church and Clergy of England.” (Henry had broken with the Roman Catholic Church. Pope Clement VII  voided the annulment of his marriage to Catherine of Aragon and excommunicated him).

14th January 1604 … In England the Hampton Court Conference begins, at which Puritan representatives meet with their new king, James I, to discuss proposed changes in the Church of England.

13th January 1501 … Christianity’s first vernacular hymnal is printed in Prague. It contains eighty-nine hymns in the Czech language.

12th January 1972 … The South Dakota Episcopal Diocese consecrates the Reverend Harold S. Jones as a suffragen bishop. Jones, a Sioux, becomes the first Native American bishop in the Episcopal Church.

11th January 1843 … Death of Francis Scott Key, Maryland-born lawyer, poet, and author of America’s national anthem. Key was also among the organizers of the Domestic and Foreign Missionary Society, founded in 1820.

10th January 1984 … The United States and the Vatican reestablish diplomatic relations after severing them in 1867

9th January 1943 … The popular World War II song “Praise the Lord and Pass the Ammunition!” reaches number one on the pop music charts. Performed by Kay Kyser, the song was inspired by the attack on Pearl Harbour on December 7, 1941.

8th January 1956 … Death of five American missionaries – Jim Elliot, Nate Saint, Roger Youderian, Ed McCully, and Pete Fleming – killed by the Auca Indians of Ecuador, whom they were attempting to evangelize.

7th January 367 … Athanasius, the early Church father famous for his battles against the Arian heresy, writes a letter containing a list of what he regards as the authoritative books of the New Testament.  Over time his list is adopted as the canon by the Church at large.

6th January 1924 … The first worship service broadcast over radio from a church is aired by the British Broadcasting Company in England. The service is conducted by H.R.L. Sheppard at St. Martin-in-the-Fields Church.

5th January 1527 … Martyrdom of Felix Manz, twenty-nine, Swiss Anabaptist reformer. Manz is drowned as punishment for preaching adult baptism, becoming the first Protestant martyred by other Protestants.

4th January 1581 … Birth of James Ussher, Anglican prelate. Ussher published a biblical chronology that dates the creation back to 4004 BC.

3rd January 1816 … Birth of Ann Ayres, founder of the Sisterhood of the Holy Communion – the first U.S Episcopal sisterhood. Ayers was thus the first woman in the United States to become a Protestant sister.

2nd January 1921 … The first religious radio program in U.S broadcast history is heard when Calvary Episcopal Church of Pittsburgh airs its worship service over local station KDKA. The preacher is the Reverend Edwin Jan Van Etten.

1st January 1484 … Birth of Swiss  reformer  Ulrich Zwingli, whose sermons criticizing the Catholic Massstarted the Reformation in Switzerland.

31st December 999 … European Christians expect the world to end after this night – the last day before AD 1000.

30th December 1927 … The International Church of the Foursquare Gospel is incorporated in Los Angeles. Founded in 1923 by evangelist Aimee Semple McPherson, the denomination provided a significant outlet for women in ministry. Today more than 40 percent of its ministerial roles are filled by women.

29th December 1170 … Thomas a’ Becket, archbishop of Canterbury from 1162, is murdered by four of King Henry II’s Norman Knights. Once a close friend of Henry’s, as his archbishop, Becket had opposed the king over several critical tax and church issues.

28th December 1384 … English reformer John Wycliffe suffers a paralyzing stroke. Known as the “morning star of the Reformation,” Wycliffe died three days later , on his sixty -fourth birthday. Wycliffe authored the first complete translation of the Bible into English. His life also influenced other reformers; including Jan Hus, Martin Luther, and John Calvin.

27th December 1943 … The film Song of Bernadette is released by the Fox Film Corporation (later Twentieth Century Fox). The film tells the story of Bernadette Soubirous, a fourteen year old French Catholic peasant girl who experienced eighteen visions of the Virgin Mary at Lourdes in 1858.

26th December 1887 … Birth of Charles B. Booth, American social reformer and grandson of Salvation Army founder William Booth. Charles served as the head of the Volunteers of America from 1949 to 1958.

25th December 336 … The earliest reference to observing Jesus’ nativity on December 25 is found in the Philocalian calendar of 354, which dates the Roman origin of the practice to 336.

24th December 1912 … Death of Charlotte “Lottie” Moon, American Baptist missionary to China. After forty years of service with the Southern Baptist Mission Board, Moon suffered with the Chinese people in a terrible famine. Slowly starving while sharing her food with others, she later died aboard the ship that was taking her back to America. 1996 … Wedding of Pastors Grant and Julie Fickel of Firefall Christian Church.

23rd December 1531 … Swiss reformer Heinrich Bullinger takes the place of the slain Ulrich Zwingli as pastor of the Grossmunster Church of Zurich. Bullinger continues Zwingli’s practice of preaching through the Bible verse by verse, and his wisdom and influence soon spread across Europe.

22nd December 1763 … John Wesley writes in his journal, “Lord, not let me live to be useless!”

21st December 1849 “Shepherd of Tender Youth,” the earliest known hymn in Christendom (outside the New Testament ), first appears in print in English in The Congregationalist, a denominational magazine edited by the poems translator, the Reverend Henry Martyn Dexter. The original hymn was authored by Clement of Alexandria (ca. 170 – 220 ad).

20th December 1787 … The Shakers in America begin experiencing revival under the guidance of their third leader, the Reverend Joseph Meacham.

19th December 1861 … Charles Haddon Spurgeon, English Baptist preacher, erects an almshouse for the elderly. Spurgeon later established a school for needy children in London (1864), founded the Stockwell Orphanages (1866), and established a private hospital (1867).

18th December 1707 … Birth of Charles Wesley, English hymn writer and younger brother of John Wesley. Charles wrote sixty-five hundred hymns including Jesus, Lover of My Soul, and Hark the Herald Angels Sing.

17th December 1889 … American revivalist Dwight L. Moody establishes the Bible Institute for Home and Foreign Missions in Chicago.

16th December 1904 … Fifteen year old (Sadhu) Sundar Singh burns a Bible in his rage at the death of his mother. A few days later, he was miraculously converted to the Christian faith, and went on to become an apostle to India and Tibet.

15th December 1870 … African – American leader Robert Payne organises the Coloured Methodist Episcopal Church in Jackson, Mississippi.

14th December 1853 … Illinois Institute opens under the Wesleyans. In 1860 the financially troubled institution requested help from the Congregationalists. Jonathon Blanchard, a Presbyterian pastor and academic, was appointed president, and the school changed its name to Wheaton College.

13th December 1985 … Dutch born Catholic priest and educator Henri J.M.Nouwen reflects in “The Road to Daybreak,” I must pray for the strength and courage to be truly obedient to Jesus, even if he calls me to go where I would rather not go”.

12th December 1840 … Birth of Charlotte “Lottie” Moon, American missionary appointed by the Southern Baptist Mission Board to serve in Ping-tu, China. Today Lottie Moon is regarded as the patron saint of Southern Baptist missions.

11th December 1792 … Birth of Joseph Mohr , German Catholic priest  and author of the Christmas poem “Stille Nacht” (“Silent Night”), which was set to music by church organist Franz Gruber.

10th December 1739 … English revivalist George Whitfield prays, “Lord grant we may always keep between the two extremes of distrusting or tempting Thee.’

9th December 1917 … The Ottoman Empire surrenders Jerusalem to the British, ending 700 years of rule by Muslim Turks. Palestine remained a protectorate of Great Britain until Israel became an independent state in 1948.

8th December 1630 … Roger Williams sails for America to escape persecution in England for preaching against church-state unions. Persecuted also in the New World, he later fled to Narragansett Bay where he founded a settlement named Providence. There Williams established the colony of Rhode Island and founded the first Baptist Church in America.

7th December 1941 … The popular wartime phrase, “Praise the Lord and pass the ammunition!” is coined by naval chaplain Howell M. Forgy aboard the cruiser U.S.S. New Orleans, which was among the ships attacked during the Japanese air raid on Pearl Harbour.

6th December 1787  … Cokesbury College, the first Methodist college in America, opens in Abingdon, Maryland. It was named after bishops Thomas Coke and Francis Asbury.

5th December 1907 … Death of Priscilla Jane Owens, American Methodist schoolteacher and hymn writer. Her best-known hymns are “Jesus Saves” and “We have an Anchor”.

4th December 1985 … Dutch-born Catholic priest and Educator Henri J.M Nouwen reflects in The Road to Daybreak, “The heart knows so much more than the mind.”

3rd December 1902 … Birth of Mitsuo Fuchida, the general who flew the lead plane in the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbour. Following World War II, General Fuchida was converted from Buddhism to Christianity by representatives of the Pocket Testament League.

2nd January 1921 … The first religious radio program in U.S broadcast history is heard when Calvary Episcopal Church of Pittsburgh airs its worship service over local station KDKA. The preacher is the Reverend Edwin Jan Van Etten.

1st January 1484 … Birth of Swiss  reformer  Ulrich Zwingli, whose sermons criticizing the Catholic Massstarted the Reformation in Switzerland.

31st December 999 … European Christians expect the world to end after this night – the last day before AD 1000.

30th December 1927 … The International Church of the Foursquare Gospel is incorporated in Los Angeles. Founded in 1923 by evangelist Aimee Semple McPherson, the denomination provided a significant outlet for women in ministry. Today more than 40 percent of its ministerial roles are filled by women.

29th December 1170 … Thomas a’ Becket, archbishop of Canterbury from 1162, is murdered by four of King Henry II’s Norman Knights. Once a close friend of Henry’s, as his archbishop, Becket had opposed the king over several critical tax and church issues.

28th December 1384 … English reformer John Wycliffe suffers a paralyzing stroke. Known as the “morning star of the Reformation,” Wycliffe died three days later , on his sixty -fourth birthday. Wycliffe authored the first complete translation of the Bible into English. His life also influenced other reformers; including Jan Hus, Martin Luther, and John Calvin.

27th December 1943 … The film Song of Bernadette is released by the Fox Film Corporation (later Twentieth Century Fox). The film tells the story of Bernadette Soubirous, a fourteen year old French Catholic peasant girl who experienced eighteen visions of the Virgin Mary at Lourdes in 1858.

26th December 1887 … Birth of Charles B. Booth, American social reformer and grandson of Salvation Army founder William Booth. Charles served as the head of the Volunteers of America from 1949 to 1958.

25th December 336 … The earliest reference to observing Jesus’ nativity on December 25 is found in the Philocalian calendar of 354, which dates the Roman origin of the practice to 336.

24th December 1912 … Death of Charlotte “Lottie” Moon, American Baptist missionary to China. After forty years of service with the Southern Baptist Mission Board, Moon suffered with the Chinese people in a terrible famine. Slowly starving while sharing her food with others, she later died aboard the ship that was taking her back to America. 1996 … Wedding of Pastors Grant and Julie Fickel of Firefall Christian Church.

23rd December 1531 … Swiss reformer Heinrich Bullinger takes the place of the slain Ulrich Zwingli as pastor of the Grossmunster Church of Zurich. Bullinger continues Zwingli’s practice of preaching through the Bible verse by verse, and his wisdom and influence soon spread across Europe.

22nd December 1763 … John Wesley writes in his journal, “Lord, not let me live to be useless!”

21st December 1849 “Shepherd of Tender Youth,” the earliest known hymn in Christendom (outside the New Testament ), first appears in print in English in The Congregationalist, a denominational magazine edited by the poems translator, the Reverend Henry Martyn Dexter. The original hymn was authored by Clement of Alexandria (ca. 170 – 220 ad).

20th December 1787 … The Shakers in America begin experiencing revival under the guidance of their third leader, the Reverend Joseph Meacham.

19th December 1861 … Charles Haddon Spurgeon, English Baptist preacher, erects an almshouse for the elderly. Spurgeon later established a school for needy children in London (1864), founded the Stockwell Orphanages (1866), and established a private hospital (1867).

18th December 1707 … Birth of Charles Wesley, English hymn writer and younger brother of John Wesley. Charles wrote sixty-five hundred hymns including Jesus, Lover of My Soul, and Hark the Herald Angels Sing.

17th December 1889 … American revivalist Dwight L. Moody establishes the Bible Institute for Home and Foreign Missions in Chicago.

16th December 1904 … Fifteen year old (Sadhu) Sundar Singh burns a Bible in his rage at the death of his mother. A few days later, he was miraculously converted to the Christian faith, and went on to become an apostle to India and Tibet.

15th December 1870 … African – American leader Robert Payne organises the Coloured Methodist Episcopal Church in Jackson, Mississippi.

14th December 1853 … Illinois Institute opens under the Wesleyans. In 1860 the financially troubled institution requested help from the Congregationalists. Jonathon Blanchard, a Presbyterian pastor and academic, was appointed president, and the school changed its name to Wheaton College.

13th December 1985 … Dutch born Catholic priest and educator Henri J.M.Nouwen reflects in “The Road to Daybreak,” I must pray for the strength and courage to be truly obedient to Jesus, even if he calls me to go where I would rather not go”.

12th December 1840 … Birth of Charlotte “Lottie” Moon, American missionary appointed by the Southern Baptist Mission Board to serve in Ping-tu, China. Today Lottie Moon is regarded as the patron saint of Southern Baptist missions.

11th December 1792 … Birth of Joseph Mohr , German Catholic priest  and author of the Christmas poem “Stille Nacht” (“Silent Night”), which was set to music by church organist Franz Gruber.

10th December 1739 … English revivalist George Whitfield prays, “Lord grant we may always keep between the two extremes of distrusting or tempting Thee.’

9th December 1917 … The Ottoman Empire surrenders Jerusalem to the British, ending 700 years of rule by Muslim Turks. Palestine remained a protectorate of Great Britain until Israel became an independent state in 1948.

8th December 1630 … Roger Williams sails for America to escape persecution in England for preaching against church-state unions. Persecuted also in the New World, he later fled to Narragansett Bay where he founded a settlement named Providence. There Williams established the colony of Rhode Island and founded the first Baptist Church in America.

7th December 1941 … The popular wartime phrase, “Praise the Lord and pass the ammunition!” is coined by naval chaplain Howell M. Forgy aboard the cruiser U.S.S. New Orleans, which was among the ships attacked during the Japanese air raid on Pearl Harbour.

6th December 1787  … Cokesbury College, the first Methodist college in America, opens in Abingdon, Maryland. It was named after bishops Thomas Coke and Francis Asbury.

5th December 1907 … Death of Priscilla Jane Owens, American Methodist schoolteacher and hymn writer. Her best-known hymns are “Jesus Saves” and “We have an Anchor”.

4th December 1985 … Dutch-born Catholic priest and Educator Henri J.M Nouwen reflects in The Road to Daybreak, “The heart knows so much more than the mind.”

3rd December 1902 … Birth of Mitsuo Fuchida, the general who flew the lead plane in the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbour. Following World War II, General Fuchida was converted from Buddhism to Christianity by representatives of the Pocket Testament League.

2nd December 1960 … The archbishop of Canterbury, Geoffrey Fisher, meets with Pope John XXIII in the Vatican. It is the first meeting between leaders of the Anglican and Roman Catholic faiths since the founding of the Church of England in 1534.

1st December 1917 … Edward J. Flanagan establishes Boys Town, a home for orphaned and problem children in Omaha, Nebraska. Father Flanagan believed there was no such thing as a boy beyond hope.

30th November 1894 … In Naperville, Illinois, seven groups withdraw from the Evangelical Association to form the United Evangelical Church.

29th November 1847 … Death of Marcus Whitman, American Presbyterian medical missionary to the American Northwest Indians murdered by a party of Cayuse Indians in present-day Washington State. Along with Whitman, his wife Narcissa, and twelve others were also massacred.

28th November 1918 … Birth of Madeleine L’Engle, American author, who won the 1963 Newbery Medal for A Wrinkle in Time.

27th November 1921 … The first church of the airwaves is established when services of the Radio Church of America are broadcast by Walter J. Garvey from his home in the Bronx.

26th November 1789 … President George Washington proclaims this date (a Thursday) as the first national Thanksgiving Day holiday. In 1863 President Abraham Lincoln established the fourth Thursday in November as a Permanent annual Thanksgiving Day.

25th November 2348 BC … The “Great Deluge” (Noah’s flood) began on this date – according to the reckoning of Irish archbishop James Ussher. Ussher’s Chronology of the Old and New Testaments is the source of the dates inserted in the margins of many editions of the KJV Bible.

24th November 1713 … Birth of Junipero Serra, Spanish born Franciscan missionary to western North America. Serra arrived in Mexico in 1749, extended his labours to northern California n 1769, and established nine of the first twenty-one Franciscan missions founded along the Pacific Coast, including San Francisco, Santa Barbara, Santa Clara, and San Juan Capistrano. Serra has been aptly called the “apostle of California”.

23rd November 1947 … Eliezer L. Sukenik of Jerusalem’s Hebrew University receives word of the existence of the Dead Sea Scrolls. The Ancient Documents (ca. 200 BC – AD 70) had been discovered the previous winter by two Bedouin shepherds in the vicinity of Qumran.

22nd November 1963 … Death of C.S. Lewis, English literary scholar, novelist, critic, and Christian apologist. Well known for authoring The Chronicles of Narnia (1950 – 56), Lewis also wrote other Christian classics, including The Screwtape Letters (1942), The Great Divorce (1945), Miracles (1947), and Mere Christianity (1952).

21st November 1948… The Sunday morning religious program Lamp Unto My Feet debuts on CBS television. It becomes one of TV’s longest running network shows, airing through January 1979.

20th November 1741 … Birth of Samuel Kirkland, American missionary to the Oneida Indians. Kirkland was influential in keeping the Six Nations neutral during the American Revolution. He also was the founder of the Hamilton Oneida Academy (1793), which later became Hamilton College.

19th November 1910 … Swedish Pentecostal Missionaries Daniel Berg and Adolf Vingren arrive in Brazil. In 1918they establish the first Pentecostal church in Brazil, which grew into the country’s largest Protestant body, the Assemblies of God.

18th November 1866 .. English devotional writer Katherine Hankey pens the verses we sing today as the hymn “I Love to Tell the Story”.

17th November 1808 … Death of David Zeisberger, Moravian missionary to Native Americans. He established Indian congregations in Pennsylvania, Ohio, and Canada, but the churches he founded did not survive.

16th November 1828 … Birth of Timothy Dwight, American Congregational clergyman. Dwight was a renowned New Testament scholar and served on the revision committee of the American Standard Version of the Bible.

15th November 1917 …Death of  Oswald Chambers, Scottish Bible teacher and author. During the last years of his life , Chambers served as a chaplain to British troops stationed in Egypt during World War 1. His posthumous devotional, My Utmost for His Highest, has become a classic.

14th November 1864 … Birth of Helen H. Lemmel, English -born sacred vocalist and hymn writer. She penned five hundred hymns (many for children), including the still-popular “Turn Your Eyes upon Jesus”.

13th November 1913 … Birth of Alexander Scourby, American actor. His most memorable screen role was Giant (1956), but he became better known for his resonant bass voice, which he loaned to some of the first readings of the King James Bible on audiocassette.

12th November 1899 … American evangelist Dwight L. Moody begins his last evangelistic campaign in Kansas City, Missouri. Becoming ill during the final service, Moody was unable to finish his message. He died on December 22.

11th November 1561 … Death of Hans Tausen, advocate of the Danish Reformation. Known as the “Danish Luther”, Tausen served as Protestant bishop in Ribe (1942 -61) and translated the Pentateuch into Danish.

10th November 432 … Patrick, a young British monk who had once been held captive by the Irish, returns to the land of his captivity and begins a lifelong mission to the Irish people. Ministering there for more than fifty years, St. Patrick came to be known as the “apostle of Ireland.”

9th November 1732 … St. Alfonso Maria de Liguori establishes the Congregation of the Most Holy Redeemer (Redemptorists) in Scala, Italy. The religious order was officially approved in 1749.

8th November 1837 … Mt Holyoke Seminary opens in Massachusetts. Founded by Mary Lyon, it was the first college in the United States established specifically for the education of women.

7th November 1918 … Birth of American Baptist evangelist William Franklin “Billy” Graham. Converted at 16 under revivalist Mordecai Ham, Graham began an evangelistic career in 1944 with Youth for Christ. In 1950 he founded the Billy Graham Evangelistic Association and went on to conduct evangelistic crusades all over the world. During his meetings, more than 2 million individuals have come forward to accept Christ.

6th November 1935 … Death of American revivalist William Ashley “Billy” Sunday. After a professional baseball career from 1883 to 1890, Sunday was ordained as a Presbyterian minister in 1903. Until the advent of Billy Graham, no other American evangelist preached to as many people nor counted as many conversions as did Billy Sunday.

5th November 1841 …Birth of Daniel C. Roberts, American clergyman and hymn writer. Roberts’ name endures as author of the hymn “God Of Our Fathers, Whose Almighty Hand”.

4th November 1646 … The Massachusetts Bay Colony passed a law making it a capital offense to deny that the Bible was the Word of God. A person convicted of the offense was liable to the death penalty.

3rd November 1759 … Martin Luther’s male lineage ends with the death of his great, great grandson, Martin Gottlieb Luther, a Dresden attorney.

2nd November 1917 … British foreign secretary Arthur J. Balfour issues the Balfour Declaration, calling for “establishment in Palestine of a national home for the Jewish people.” This document plants a seed that led to the founding of the modern state of Israel in 1948.

1st November 1963 … English linguistic scholar J.R.R. Tolkien summarizes Christian belief in a letter to his son: “In the last resort, faith is an act of will , inspired by love.”

31st October 1517 … German reformer Martin Luther nails his “Ninety Five Theses … for the Purpose of Eliciting Truth” to the door of the Wittenberg Palace Church. His action symbolically touches off what would grow to become the Protestant Reformation. By 1522 Protestant public worship was being celebrated in Wittenberg for the first time.

30th October 1976 … Dr. Joseph H. Evans is elected president of the Uniting Church of Christ, thereby becoming thefirst African-American leader of a predominantly white denomination.

29th October 1885 … Death of James Hannington, Anglican missionary prelate, who in 1884 was appointed as the first bishop of of Eastern Equatorial Africa. Hannington was speared to death in Mombasa.

28th October 1871 … Henry Morton Stanley locates “missing”British missionary and explorer Dr. David Livingstone at Ujiji, in modern Tanzania’s Kigoma province. Stanley’s first words: “Dr. Livingstone I presume?”

27th October 1469 … Birth of Desiderius Erasmus, Dutch Christian humanist, philosopher, and scholar. Regarded as the leader of the Renaissance in northern Europe, Erasmus’s writings paved the way for the Reformation.

26th October 312 … Two days before the battle of Milvian Bridge, Roman Emperor Constantine has a vision of the cross of Christ. The vision ultimately turned him into a believer and a supporter of Christianity.

25th October 1941 … The first youth for Christ rally is held, at Bryant’s alliance Tabernacle in Manhattan.

24th October 1826 … Death of Ann (Hasseltine) Judson, American pioneer missionary. In 1812 she and Harriet Newell became the first to US women commissioned to serve as overseas missionaries.

23rd October 1819 … Pioneer missionaries Hiram Bingham and Asa  Thurston set sail, becoming the first Protestant missionaries to the Sandwich Islands (Hawaii). They were sponsored by the American Board of Commissioners for Foreign Missions.

22nd October 1697 … Birth of Katherina von Schlegel, German Lutheran sacred poet. One of her poems was translated into English by Jane L. Borthwick and became the hymn “Be Still, My Soul”.

21st October 1555 … English Catholic Queen Mary Tudor begins a series of fierce persecutions against Protestantism, in which more than 200 men, women, and children were put to death for their faith. Mary was startled to discover that the martyrdoms only intensified Protestant zeal.

20th October 1632 … Birth of Christopher Wren, English church architect and astronomer, who proposed the plan for rebuilding London after the Great Fire of 1666. In all, Wren designed more than fifty London churches, including St. Paul’s Cathedral.

19th October 1656 … Massachusetts passes a law prohibiting the further immigration of Quakers into the Puritan colony. This prohibition led indirectly to the later establishment of the colony of Pennsylvania.

18th October 1469 … Isabella of Castille marries Ferdinand II of Aragon, effectively uniting nearly all the Christian areas of Spain under one monarchy.

17th October 1979 … The Nobel Peace Prize is awarded to Mother Teresa (Agnes Bojaxhiu), the Albanian Catholic nun who founded the Society of the Missionaries of Charity.

16th October 1812 … Death of Henry Martyn, Anglican missionary to India and Persia. During his brief ministry, Martyn translated the New Testament into Urdu and Persian.

15th October 1932 … Gladys Aylward sails from Liverpool, England, for Asia in an effort to bring the gospel to China. In 1958 her biography, The Small Woman, was made into an award-winning film: Inn of the Sixth Happiness.

14th October 1922 … In Detroit the Evangelical Association and the United Evangelical Church merge to form the Evangelical Church, with a combined membership of 260,000.

13th October 1605 … Death of Theodore Beza, John Calvin’s successor in Geneva as the head of the Swiss Reformation.

12th October 1895 … Death of Cecil Frances Alexander, Irish poet, hymn writer, and wife of William Alexander, an Irish clergyman who became Primate of Ireland in 1893. During her life Alexander published several volumes of verse, and three of her poems later became popular hymns: All Things Bright and Beautiful, Jesus Calls Us, and There is a Green Hill Far Away.

11th October 1998 … Pope John Paul II decrees the first Jewish-born saint of the modern era, Edith Stein (1891 to 1942). A German Carmelite nun and spiritual writer, Stein was arrested by the Nazis because of her Jewish ancestry. She was murdered at Auschwitz on August 10, 1942.

10th October 1560 … Birth of Dutch reformed clergyman James (Jacob) Arminius. As a professor at Leiden (1603-09), Arminius could not accept the strict Calvinist teaching on predestination, and instead developed a doctrine of universal redemption and conditional predestination. Arminian theology is evident today in Methodist doctrine.

9th October 1974 … Death of Czech born German businessman Oskar Schindler, who is credited with saving more than 2000 Jews during the Holocaust. Although a strong Catholic, Schindler, at his own request, was buried in Jerusalem.

8th October 451 … The Council of Chalcedon opens near Istanbul (Byzantium) in Asia minor. Attended by more than 500 bishops (the largest attendance of the early councils), the Council produced a statement of faith, known afterward as the Chalcedonian Definition.

7th October 1873 … Baptist missionary Charlotte “Lottie”Moon arrives in China. Though born into wealth, Moon gave her whole life to missions and said,”If I had a thousand lives, I would give them all for the women of China”.

6th October 1520 …German Reformer Martin Luther publishes his famous Prelude on the Babylonian Captivity of the Church, which attacks the sacramental system of the Catholic Church.

5th October 1744 …David Brainerd begins his missionary work among the Indians along New Jersey’s Susquehanna River.

4th October 1965 … Pope Paul VI arrives in New York City, making him the first pope to visit America. On the first day of his visit, he celebrates Mass at Yankee Stadium and addresses the United Nations on the need for world peace.

3rd October 1690… Death of Robert Barclay, Scottish Quaker theologian. He published An Apology for the True Christian’s Divinity, an important statement of Quaker doctrine.

2nd October 1930 … The International Lutheran Hour debuts on a network of thirty-six American radio stations, with Dr. Walter A. Maier as speaker.

1st October 1878 … The Regions Beyond Mission, an evangelical Baptist organization, opens Harley College in Ireland. The school has since trained hundreds of missionaries.

30th September 420 … Death of Jerome, Bible  scholar and one of the most learned of the Latin Fathers. Originally from Rome, Jerome moved to Bethlehem, entered a monastery, and devoted himself to translating the Bible into Latin (bequeathing to the Western Church the Vulgate Bible). He also prepared numerous works of ecclesiastical history and biblical interpretation.

29th September 1770 … The day before his premature death at age fifty-six, English revivalist George Whitefield prays, “Lord Jesus, I am weary in thy work, but not of it.”

28th September 1931 … C. S. Lewis undergoes a spiritual conversion while riding to the zoo in his brother Warren’s motorcycle side-car. Lewis later wrote, “When we set out , I did not believe that Jesus is the Son of God; and when we reached the zoo I did.” Lewis’s conversion followed a long conversation he’d had the week before with two Christian friends, J.R.R. Tolkien and Hugo Dyson.

27th September 1785 … American Anglicans meet in Philadelphia to create a denomination independent from the Church of England. The new denomination came to be known as the Protestant Episcopal Church in the U.S.A.

26th September 1835 … Eight churches in Florida establish the Suwanee Association, the first official Baptist organization in the state.

25th September 1800… Revival leaders Philip William Otterbein and Martin Boehm establish the Church of the United Brethren in Christ. Boehm was brought up in the Mennonite tradition, and Otterbein was a pastor of the German Reformed Church.

24th September 787 … The Second Council of Nicaea opens – the seventh of twenty-one ecumenical councils recognized by the Catholic Church. Under Pope Adrian I, the council limited the veneration of icons but condemned iconoclasm.

23rd September 1747 … David Brainerd, two weeks before dying from tuberculosis, journals .. “Felt uncommonly peaceful, it seemed as if I had done all my work in this world, and stood ready for my call to a better. As long as I see anything to be done for God, life is worth having; but O how vain and unworthy it is to live for any lower end!”

22nd September 1734 … The first Moravian settlement in America begins with the arrival of the Schwenkfelders (followers of reformer Caspar Schwenkfeld von Ossig) in Philadelphia.

21st September 1522 … Martin Luther publishes his German New Testament, based on Erasmus’s 1516 Greek edition.

20th September 1870 … During the Franco-Prussian War, Italian troops occupy Rome, effectively ending the Vatican I Ecumenical Council.

19th September 1772 … Moravian missionaries complete construction of the first Protestant church west of the Alleghenies, in Schoenbrunn, Ohio. The Reverend David Zeisberger was the first preacher at the church.

18th September 1924 … Scottish born American scholar James Moffat completes his work on the Old Testament portion of what would become A New Testament Translation of the Bible, Containing the Old and New Testaments is published in 1926.

17th September 1787 … Ratified on this date, Article 6, Section 3 of the US Constitution reads, “No religious tests shall ever be required as a qualification to any office or public trust under the United States.”

16th September 1976 … In Minneapolis the Episcopal Church approves the ordination of women to the priesthood, specifically approving an action in which four bishops had ordained 11 women to the Episcopal priesthood on July 29, 1974 – at that time in defiance of church law.

15th September 1966 … The American Bible Society publishes its Good News for Modern Man New Testament translation.

14th September 1741 … English composer George Frideric Handel finishes work on his great oratorio Messiah, which he composed in only 24 days.

13th September 1771 … English founder of Methodism, John Wesley, writes in a letter to a young Christian, “It is right to pour out our whole soul before him and the carer for us. But it is good, likewise, to under was ourselves to a friend, in whom we can confide.

12th September 1928 … The first international conference of the Pocket Testament League convenes in Birmingham, England.

11th September  1069 … Death of English prelate Aldred (Ealdred), Archbishop of York. On Christmas Day 1066, Eldridge crowned William the Conqueror King of England. Aldred was also the first English bishop to make a pilgrimage to Jerusalem.

10th September 1898 … Death of Alexander Crummell, African-American Episcopal clergyman, scholar, and missionary to West Africa. Ordained in 1844, Crummell served as president of Liberia College for 20 years.

9th September  1747 … Birth of Thomas Coke, the first Methodist consecrated as a bishop to America. He served with France’s as read from 1784 to 1797 and later became president of the English Methodist conference. Coke died at sea in 1814 while sailing to do missionary work in India.

8th September 1974 … At the Naval air station in Atlanta, Georgia, Lieutenant Vivian McFadden is sworn in as the first female African American chaplain of the U.S. Navy.

7th September 1559… Death of Robert Estienne (also known as Robertus Stephanus and Robert Stephens), French scholar and printer who in 1551 became the first to print the Bible with modern verse divisions.

6th September 1620 … With 101 passengers on board the Mayflower sails from Plymouth, England, bound for the New World. The ship was ninety feet long and twenty-six feet wide. Two months and five days later, the ship landed near modern day Cape Cod, Massachusetts.

5th September 1802 … Birth of Frederick Oakeley, an Anglican clergyman who became a Catholic during the time of the Oxford Movement (1845). Oakeley authored several volumes of poetry, and his translation of the Latin “Adeste Fidelis” gave the church the popular carol “O Come , All Ye Faithful”.

4th September 1847 … Scottish Anglican clergyman Henry Francis Lyte pens the words to his last (and best known) hymn: “Abide with Me: Fast Falls the Eventide.”

3rd September 1752 … This date became September 14 when Great Britain (including Scotland, Ireland, Wales and the American colonies) officially adopted the Gregorian calendar – developed by Pope Gregory XIII in 1582 to replace the older, now inaccurate, Julian Calendar.

2nd September 1973 … Death of J.R.R. Tolkien, English Philologist and fantasy novelist. A devout Catholic, Tolkien wrote The Hobbit (1937) and The Lord of the Rings trilogy (1954-55).

1st September 1785 … Birth of pioneer circuit rider Peter Cartwright, perhaps the best known of the early Methodist preachers along the American frontier. Cartwright later served in the Illinois state legislature and was defeated in an 1846 race for Congress by Abraham Lincoln.

31st August 1688 … Death of separatist clergyman John Bunyan, author of two English-language masterpieces: Grace Abounding to the Chief of Sinners (1666) and The Pilgrim’s Progress (1678).

30th August 1856 … The Methodist Episcopal Church establishes Wilberforce University, in Xenia, Ohio. Ownership of the school was transferred to the African Methodist Episcopal (AME) Church in 1863.

29th August 1792 … Birth of American revivalist and educator Charles G. Finney, who served as president of Oberlin College from 1851 to 1866.

28th August 430 … Death of Augustine of Hippo, an early Latin church father and one of the outstanding theological figures of the ages. It was Augustine who wrote, “Thou hast made us for thyself, O Lord, and our hearts are restless till they find their rest in thee.

27th August 1876 … Thirteen-year-old G. Campbell Morgan delivers his first sermon. He later became one of the most renowned expository preachers and writers of the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries.

26th August 1901 … The New Testament of the American Standard Version Bible is published. This U.S edition of the 1881 English Revised Version comprises the first major  American Bible translation.

25th August 1864 … Birth of John Henry Jowett, English Congregational clergyman and pastor of Westminster Chapel in London (1918 – 23).

24th August 1747 … Birth of John A. Dickins, pioneer church leader who first suggested the denominational name Methodist Episcopal Church.

23rd August 1948 … The World Council of Churches is founded in Amsterdam, with 147 member churches. It soon establishes its headquarters in Geneva, Switzerland.

22nd August 1968 … Pope Paul VI arrives in Colombia for the first ever papal visit to South America.

21st August 1912 … William Bramwell Booth, son of founder William Booth, becomes head of the American Salvation Army.

20th August 1553 … Protestant reformer John Calvin concludes in a letter, “Seeing that a Pilot steers the ship in which we sail, who will never allow us to perish even in the midst of shipwrecks, there is no reason why our minds should be overwhelmed with fear and overcome with weariness.”

19th August 1886 … Baptist clergyman Richard G. Spurling establishes the Christian Union in Monroe County, Tennessee. In 1923 this Pentecostal denomination became the Church of God  (Cleveland , Tennessee).

18th August 1927 … Twenty year old Theodore Epp is converted to a living faith. A pioneer in Christian radio broadcasting, Epp founded Back to the Bible, an evangelistic radio program, in 1939. Back to the Bible is now heard on more than six hundred stations around the world.

17th August 1761 … Birth of William Carey, pioneer English missionary to India. Carey taught at Fort William College in Calcutta from 1801 until his death in 1834, and helped establish Serampore Press, which made the Bible accessible to more than 300 million people.

16th August 1972 … Philip A . Potter, a West Indian Methodist clergyman, is named general secretary of the World Council of Churches.

15th August 1456 … The first volume of the two volume Gutenberg Bible is finally bound by Henry Cremer after a two year printing process.At its completion, the Gutenberg Bible became both the first full-length book to be printed in the West, and the first printed edition of the scriptures.

14th August 1248 … Rebuilding of the Cologne Cathedral – the largest Gothic-style cathedral in Northern Europe – begins in Germany. The cathedral was first built in 873 but was destroyed by fire. The rebuilding project was completed exactly 632 years later, on August 14, 1880. The cathedral was damaged again during World War II.

13th August 1682 … The first Welsh immigrants to the American colonies arrive in Pennsylvania and settle near modern day Philadelphia.

12th August 1715 … Death of Nahum Tate, British poet and dramatist, who wrote the New Version of the Psalms of David (1696) and the popular Christmas carol “While Shepherds Watched Their Flocks”.

11th August 1760 … Irish-born English minister Philip Embury arrives in New York, making him the first Methodist clergyman to come to America. In 1768 he founded Wesley Chapel.

10th August 1933 … Wycliffe Bible Translators gets its start at the Day of Prayer for the Tribes of Latin America in Keswick, New Jersey. Incorporated in 1942, WBT has since grown into one of the largest interdenominational  missionary agencies in the world.

9th August 1788 … Birth of Adoniram Judson, pioneer American Baptist missionary to Burma. Judson translated the Bible into Burmese and also penned the hymn “Come Holy Spirit, Dove Divine”.

8th August 1539 … German reformer Martin Luther remarks in a sermon, “Reason does not know that salvation must come down from above; we want to work up from below so that the satisfaction is rendered by us.”

7th August 1560 … Ratification of the Scots Confession by the Scottish Parliament marks the triumph of the Reformation in Scotland, under the leadership of John Knox.

6th August 1774 … English religious leader Ann Lee and a small band of followers arrive in America at New York City. Her sect, the United Society of Believers in Christ’s Second Appearing, is commonly known as the Shakers.

5th August 1900 … Death of James A. Healy, the first African-American Catholic bishop.

4th August 1792 … Birth of Edward Irving, Scottish theologian, mystic, and religious leader. Irving acquired fame as a preacher, but in 1832 he was condemned as a heretic and compelled to resign from his church because of his acceptance of Pentecostal phenomena.

3rd August 1785 … The Reverend Ashbel Baldwin becomes the first Episcopalian ordained in the United States, in Middleton, Connecticut.

2nd August 1907 … The Vatican issues the Ne Temere decree, declaring that Catholic marriages are valid only if celebrated before a duly qualified priest and at least two witnesses.

1st August 1953 … British literary scholar and Christian apologist C.S Lewis writes in a letter, “How little people know who think that holiness is dull. When one meets the real thing, it is irresistible.”

31st July 1970 … The complete New American Standard Version of the Bible is published. (The NASB New Testament first appeared in 1963).

30th July 1822 … African-American clergyman James Varick is consecrated as the first bishop of the African Methodist Episcopal Zion Church.

29th July 1974 … In Philadelphia eleven women are ordained as Episcopal priests in the Church of the Advocate. The ordination was later ruled invalid by the House of Bishops, but on October 17, 1974, the House approved in principle the ordination of women as priests. The ordinations of the eleven women were finally approved on September 16, 1976.

28th July 1648 … The General Assembly of the Church of Scotland adopts the Westminster Shorter Catechism. This document, as well as the Westminster Larger Catechism, both compiled in 1647, have been in regular use among Presbyterians, Congregationalists, and Baptists ever since.

27th July 1516 … Future reformer Martin Luther preaches for the first time against indulgences. It was Luther’s posting of his “Ninety-five Theses” against indulgences and other church abuses that ultimately precipitated the Protestant Reformation.

26th July 1603 … James VI of Scotland becomes James I of England. He had been Scotland’s king since 1567, but when Elizabeth I of England died, James’s descent from Henry VIII made him the nearest heir to the English throne. Among his numerous acts affecting religious life in England was the royal order that led to publication of the Authorized (King James) Bible in 1611.

25th July 1968 … Pope Paul VI publishes Humanae Vitae, an encyclical condemning all forms of birth control except the “rhythm method”.

24th July 1216 … Cardinal Cencio Savelli is consecrated as Pope Honorius III. During his pontificate, he confirmed two well-known religious orders: the Dominicans (1216) and the Franciscans (1233)

23rd July 1825 … Kidnapped earlier by Muslim slave traders from his Yoruba homeland in north-central Africa, Samuel Adjai Crowther is rescued by English missionaries and baptised into the Church. In 1864 Crowther was consecrated as missionary bishop of the Niger Territory.

22nd July 1620 … Pastor John Robinson and a band of separatist Puritans from England, who had taken refuge in the Netherlands, leave Holland for England to emigrate to America. This congregation afterward became known as the Pilgrims.

21st July 1900 … Albert Schweitzer receives his licentiate in theology. He later became famous as a musicologist, physician, and missionary.

20th July 1726 … Colonial American Puritan clergyman Jonathan Edwards, age twenty-three, marries fellow Puritan Sarah Pierpont, age sixteen. Their marriage prospered through the next thirty-two years in a joint, active ministry, before Jonathan’s premature death in 1758.

19th July 1913 … The first Victorious Life Conference convenes in Oxford, Pennsylvania. Inspired by the Keswick Conferences held in England (beginning in 1875) and the Northfield Conferences in the United States (beginning in 1880), the Victorious Life Conference promotes the belief that a Christian can gain immediate freedom from the power of every known sin.

18th July 64 … Roman emperor Nero blames Christians for an extensive fire that destroys most of the city of Rome. His accusation brings about the first great wave of persecution on the Church.

17th July 1505 … In Germany twenty one year old Martin Luther enters the Erfurt monastery of the Augustinian Eremites. Having survived a lightning strike, Luther vowed to become a monk, took his vows in 1506, and was ordained a priest in 1507.

16th July 1937 … In eastern Germany, near Weimar, the Nazis open a concentration camp at Buchenwald. Over the next eight years (before the camp was liberated in April 1945), nearly fifty-seven thousand prisoners would die at Buchenwald.

15th July 1549 … Led by Francis Xavier, Spanish Jesuits land in Kagoshima, becoming the first Christian Missionaries to Japan. The next ninety years became known as “the Christian century of Japan”.

14th July 1892 … The Baptists Young People’s Union holds its first annual national convention in Detroit, Michigan.

13th July 1886 … Birth of Edward Flanagan, Irish-born Roman Catholic parish priest who founded the Home for Homeless Boys outside Omaha, Nebraska, which was later renamed Boys Town.

12th July 1739 … David Brainerd undergoes a personal conversion experience. He was later commissioned by the Society for the Propagation of Christian Knowledge as a missionary to the New England Indians.

11thJuly 1656 … Ann Austin and Mary Fisher, the first Quakers to arrive in America, land at Boston. They are promptly arrested by Massachusetts authorities and deported back to England five weeks later.

10th July 1925 … The Scopes Monkey Trial opens in Dayton, Tennessee, with Clarence Darrow defending John Scopes from charges of teaching evolution in his high school biology classroom, contrary to Tennessee law. At trial’s end, Scopes was found guilty and fined one hundred dollars.

9th July 381 … Birth of Nestorius, first patriarch of Constantinople, who was deposed for heresy by the Council of Ephesus in 431 for teaching that Jesus had two natures and two persons (rather than two natures in one person).

8th July 1835 … The American Liberty Bell cracks while tolling the death of Chief Justice John Marshall. The bell had been cast in England in 1752 and bore the inscription from Leviticus 25:10: “proclaim liberty throughout all the land unto all the inhabitants thereof”.

7th July 1946 … Frances Xavier Cabrini (1850-1917) is canonized by Pope Pius XII as the first American citizen to be made a saint in the Roman Catholic Church. Known as Mother Cabrini, she founded the Institute of the Missionary Sisters of the Sacred Heart and helped establish hospitals, schools, and orphanages throughout the United States and in South America.

6th July 1054 … The medieval church suffers a permanent fracture when the four eastern patriarchates – Constantinople, Alexandria, Jerusalem, and Antioch – break fellowship with the western patriarchate in Rome, marking the beginning of the Great Schism between the Roman Catholic and Eastern Orthodox churches.

5th July 1865 … English Revivalist William Booth holds the first “rescue meeting” at his newly established Christian Mission in London. In 1878 Booth changed the name of his organisation to the Salvation Army.

4th July 993 … Ulrich of Augsburg, the first official Roman Catholic saint, is canonized. Prior to this, saints were declared by popular consensus.

3rd July 1756 … English Methodism founder John Wesley writes in a letter, “One who lives and dies in error, or in dissent from our Church, may yet be saved; but one who lives and dies in sin must perish”

2nd July 1489 … Birth of Thomas Cranmer, first Protestant archbishop of Canterbury. Cranmer nullified several of King Henry VIII’s marriages, maintained the divine right of kings, and promoted translation of the Bible into the common vernacular. He was also the primary author of the 1549 Book of Common Prayer. When Queen Mary ascended to the throne of England, Cranmer was condemned for treason and burned at the stake.

1st July 1899 … The Christian Commercial Men’s Association of America is formed by three travelling businessmen: John H. Nicholson, Samuel E. Hill, and William J. Knights in Boscobel,Wisconsin. Known today as the Gideons, the organisation placed its first Bible at the Superior Hotel in Iron Mountain, Montana, in 1908.

30th June 1315 … Martyrdom of Raymond Lull, a Spanish mystic, who devoted his life as a missionary to the Islamic people. Lull first travelled to North Africa in 1291.

29th June 1875 … The first holiness conference opens at Keswick, England, emphasizing a noncharismatic “crisis” form of sanctification, in contrast to the older, Calvinist view of sanctification as a lifelong process.

28th June 1629 … The Peace of Alais is signed, ending the Huguenot Wars in France. By this treaty, French Protestants obtained religious freedom of conscience but lost military advantage in their French homeland.

27th June 1736 … At the age of twenty one future English revivalist George Whitefield preaches his first sermon as a member of the Holy Club (to which John and Charles Wesley also belonged) . Whitefield went on to preach thousands more sermons and become a force in colonial America’s “Great Awakening.”

26th June 1968 … The Wesleyan Church (a non-charismatic American holiness denomination) is formed by the union of the Wesleyan Methodist Church (organized in 1843) and the Pilgrim Holiness Church (which began as the International Holiness Union and Prayer League in 1897)

25th June 1530 … The principal creed of Lutheranism, the Augsburg Confession, is first presented to Emperor Charles V at the Diet of Augsburg. Prepared chiefly by Philipp Melancthon, its Twenty-one Articles later influenced the Anglicans Thirty-Nine Articles and John Wesley’s Twenty-three (Methodist) Articles.

24th June 1941 … The two-day Constitutional Assembly of the  Nippon Kirisuto Kyodan opens, during which the United Church of Christ in Japan is formed. Today one-third of all Japanese Protestants belong to the United Church.

23rd June 1683 … English Quaker coloniser William Penn signs his famous treaty with the Native Americans of Pennsylvania.

22nd June 1745… David Brainerd, colonial-era missionary to New England Native Americans, writes in his journal, “I am often weary of this world, and want to leave it on that account; but it is more desirable to be drawn, rather  than driven out of it.”

21st June 1821 … The African Methodist Episcopal Zion Church is formally constituted in New York City, with nineteen clergymen present, representing six African-American churches from New York, Philadelphia, New Haven, and Newark.

20th June 1885 … A band of Moravian missionaries lands on the shores of Alaska and establishes the Bethel Mission. During their first year of mission work among the natives, winter temperatures fell to fifty degrees below zero.

19th June 325 … The Council of Nicaea closes. By the end of the month-long assembly – the church’s first ecumenical council, called by Pope Sylvester I and Roman emperor Constantine I – the three hundred assembled bishops had formulated the Nicene Creed, condemned the Arian heresy (which denied the deity of Christ), and established the method for calculating the date of Easter.

18th June 1464 … Pope Pius II leads a brief crusade into Italy against the Turks. He becomes ill, however, and dies before the rest of his allies arrive.

17th June 1968 … At a meeting in Winona Lake, Indiana, the Pilgrim Holiness Church (organised in 1897) votes to approve a merger with the Wesleyan Methodist Church of America (organised in 1843).

16th June 1833 … Anglican churchman John Henry Newman pens the words to the hymn “Lead, Kindly Light, Amid the Encircling Gloom,” while travelling by ship from Italy to France.

15th June 1668 … Padre Diego Luis de Sanvitores, a Jesuit missionary from Mexico, establishes the first Roman Catholic mission on the island of Guam.

14th June 1966 … Pope Paul VI abolishes the Vatican’s Index of Prohibited Books, first issued by the Inquisition under Pope Paul IV in 1557. The Index Librorum Prohibitorum comprised a list of books that members of the Catholic Church were forbidden to read or possess.

13th June 1793 … English missions pioneer William Carey sets sail for India. Within five years, he translates nearly the entire Bible into Bengali. Today Carey is acclaimed as “the father of modern missions.”

12th June 1804 … Birth of David Abeel, American missionary to the Far East. In 1829 he sailed for China under the auspices of the Seaman’s Friend Society and later ministered in Java, Singapore, Siam, Malacca, Borneo, and other parts of Asia.

11th June 1799 … Richard Allen is ordained as a deacon of the Methodist Episcopal Church in Philadelphia. In 1816 Allen became the founding bishop of the African Methodist Episcopal Church, making him the first African-American Protestant bishop in the United States.

10th June 1692 … Bridget Bishop becomes the first person hanged for witchcraft during the Salem witch trials. In all, twenty people died as a result of these trials.

9th June 1772 … Moravian missionaries build the first Protestant church west of the Aleghenies, at Schoenbrunn, in the Ohio Territory. The Reverend  David Zeisberger serves as the church’s first preacher.

8th June 1536 … Ten Articles of Religion are published by the English clergy in support of Henry VIII’s Declaration of Supremacy. The Anglican Church thus begins outlining its doctrinal distinctives, following its break with Rome.

7th June 1959 … English apologist C.S. Lewis writes in a letter, “If we really think that home is elsewhere and that this life is a ‘wandering to find home,’ why should we not look forward to the arrival?”

6th June 1844 … In London young merchant George Williams and twelve co-workers establish the Young Men’s Christian Association. Organised to combat unhealthy conditions arising from the Industrial Revolution, the original mission of the YMCA was to improve “the spiritual condition of young men engaged in drapery and other trades“.

5th June  988 … Kiev’s Grand Prince Vladimir formally embraces the gospel, ordering his people to be baptised into the Orthodox Christian faith. Considered the apostle to the Russians, Vladimir became the first Christian ruler of that nation and afterward erected numerous churches, promoted education, and aided the poor.

4th June 1948 … In Manila the first missionary radio station (FEBC) built in the Philippines by the Far East Broadcasting Company goes on the air. Today FEBC broadcasts to every country in Asia, in more than 150 languages.

3rd June 1162 … English Catholic churchman Thomas ‘a Becket is consecrated as archbishop of Canterbury. Becket served for eight years, until increasing ideological conflicts with King Henry II ended with Becket’s martyrdom in December 1170.

2nd June 597 … Augustine, missionary to England and first Archbishop of Canterbury, baptises Ethelbert, the Saxon King. Afterwards the Christian faith spreads rapidly among the Angles and Saxons.

1st June 1841 … Scottish missionary David Livingstone departs for Africa to become a missionary explorer. Livingstone ultimately penetrated the deepest reaches of the continent, where he proclaimed the good news.

31st May 1699 … Birth of Alexander Cruden, Scottish bookseller and compiler of Cruden’s Concordance, first published in 1737 and still a standard reference today for the King James version of the Bible.

30th May 1971 … The Provincial Council of the Russian Orthodox Church, meeting in Zagorsk, elects Metropolitan Piman  as patriarch of Moscow and all Russia.

29th May 1874 … Birth of Gilbert Keith “G.K.” Chesterton, English journalist, novelist, poet, and apologist. Called the Prince of paradox for the religious dogma underlying his light literary style. Chesterton was credited by poet T. S. Eliot with doing “more than any man in his time … to maintain the existence of the (Christian) minority in the modern world.

28th May 1954 … President Dwight Eisenhower signs into law the Congressional Act, Joint Resolution 243, which adds the words under God to the Pledge of Allegiance. Ina speech given soon after, Eisenhower declares, in support of the new bill, “in this way we are reaffirming the transcendence of religious faith in America’s heritage and future”.

27th May 1564 … Death of John Calvin (born Jean Chauvin), French-born theologian and Swiss ecclesiastical reformer. Called the organizer of Protestantism, Calvin built on the premise that the Bible is the only trustworthy source of knowledge, and thereby unified the scattered reform theologies of Europe.

26th May 735 … Death of Anglo-Saxon theologian the Venerable Bede, a monk at a monastery in Jarrow, Northumberland, also known as “the father of English history”. Bede was the first great English scholar. He invented the BC/AD dating system, and his Ecclesiastical History of the English People (731) was crucial to England’s conversion to Christianity.

25th May 1876 … The Reformed Presbyterian Church of Scotland unites with the Free Church of  Scotland to form the new Free Church of Scotland.

24th May 1950 … During its annual meeting in Boston, the Northern Baptist Convention formally changes its name to the American Baptist Convention. In 1972 the denomination renamed itself the American Baptist Churches in the U.S.A.

23rd May 1955 … The General Assembly of the Presbyterian Church in the United States announces that it will permit the ordination of female clergy.

22nd May 1541 … In Germany the twenty-six-day Ratisbon Conference – seeking to unite the ideas of three Catholic theologians and three Protestant theologians – ends with tentative doctrinal agreements reached. Subsequent opposition from Martin Luther prevented any lasting reunion. After the failure of the Ratisbon Conference, the Protestant movement became permanent.

21st May 1738 … Charles Wesley is converted from a legalistic to an evangelical Christian faith. Charles entered the ministry the following year and became a gifted and tireless hymn writer known as “the sweet singer of Methodism“.

20th May 325 … On the site of modern Ankara, Turkey, the Council of Nicaea convenes the first ecumenical council of the Church, attended by nearly three hundred bishops. The council is called by Emperor Constantine, who seeks to establish peace and unity in the Christian Church.

19th May 1971 … Godspell, a musical based on the Gospel of Matthew, opens at the Cherry Lane Theatre in New York City.

18th May 1843 … Nearly half the member congregations of the National Church of Scotland secede to form the free Church of Scotland. Renowned clergyman associated with this reformed Presbyterian denomination include Thomas Charmers, Horatius and Andrew Bonar, and William Robertson Smith.     1957 … Birth of  Grant Fickel, Pastor and founder of Firefall Christian Church (Gold Coast, Queensland).

17th May 1881 … The New Testament of the English Revised Version is published in England, the first modern English translation of the scriptures published since 1611. The product of 10 years of work by 54 biblical scholars on both sides of the Atlantic, the ERV provided the scholarly foundation for the publication of the American Standard Version of the Bible in 1901 and 1905.

16th May 1540 … German reformer Martin Luther remarks, “In the worst temptations nothing can help us but faith that God’s son has put on flesh, is bone, sits at the right hand of the father, and prays for us. There is no mightier comfort.”

15th May 1948 … Death of Father Edward J. Flanagan, Irish-born parish priest, who founded the Boys Town orphanage near Omaha, Nebraska in 1917.

14th May 1607 … Priest Robert Hunt presides over the first Anglican worship service held in the New World in Virginia, on the first Sunday after the arrival of the 120 settlers comprising the Jamestown expedition.

13th May 1963 … Death of A.W. Tozer, American Christian and Missionary Alliance clergyman and Christian writer. He served as pastor of Chicago’s Southside Alliance Church for thirty-one years. Tozer’s best-remembered writing is The Pursuit of God(1948).

12th May 1861 … “The Battle Hymn of the Republic” written by Julia Ward Howe, is first performed at a flag-raising ceremony for Union recruits at Fort Warren (near Boston), during the American Civil War.

11th May 1825 … The first national tract society in America, the American Tract Society, is organised in New York City by the merger of fifty smaller societies. By 1975 the ATS was publishing 30 million tracts a year.

10th May 1886 … Birth of Karl Barth, Swiss Reformed theologian. Asked to summarise the essence of his theology, Barth once replied, “Jesus loves me this I know, for the Bible tells me so.”

9th May 1983 … Pope John Paul II announces the reversal of the Catholic Church’s 1633 condemnation of Galileo Galilee, the seventeenth-century scientist who first espoused the Copernican (sun-centred) theory of our solar system.

8th May 1816 … In the Dutch reformed Church in New York City, delegates from 35 Bible societies meet to establish the American Bible Society, which seeks to promote a wider circulation of the Scriptures, unaccompanied by notes or comments.

7th May 1907 … Birth of Kathryn Kuhlman, American itinerant evangelist and spiritual healer. She discovered her gift of healing while pastoring a small church in Pennsylvania, when people in her congregation began reporting unexpected healings during her services. Kuhlman’s best-known book is her 1962 autobiography, I believe in miracles.

6th May  1986 … The Reverend Donald E. Pelotte is ordained as the first Native American Roman Catholic bishop in Gallup, New Mexico.

5th May  1901 … Birth of Soren A. Kierkegaard, Danish philosopher and theologian widely regarded as “the father of existentialism”. Kierkegaard attacked organized religion, holding that an individual chooses truth on the basis of (subjective) faith.

4th May 1988 … Biloxi-born Catholic prelate Eugene A. Marino, SSJ, is installed as archbishop of Atlanta. He is the first African American archbishop.

3rd May 1987 … Three Lutheran bodies (the Lutheran Church, the American Lutheran Church, and the Association of Evangelical Lutheran Churches) merge to form the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America, the largest Lutheran denomination in the United States. The new denomination is officially ratified on January 1, 1988.

2nd May 373 … Death of St. Athanasius the Great, bishop of Alexandria (328-73). Known today as “the father of Orthodoxy”, Athanasius was the first Christian writer to list the twenty seven books of the New Testament that we have today.

1st May 1886 … The United Holy Church of America is founded in Method, North Carolina, a suburb of Raleigh. This predominantly African-American holiness denomination emphasizes Spirit baptism and sanctification (both regarded as works subsequent to salvation) as essential for the Christian life.

30th April 418 … Roman Emperor Honorius (395-423) issues an imperial decree denouncing the teachings of Pelagius, who taught that human nature is able to take the initial and fundamental steps toward salvation by its own efforts, apart from empowerment by divine grace.

29th April 1945 … Dawson Trotman begins teaching Bible memorization to American servicemen in San Pedro, California, marking the beginning of the Navigators organization. The Navigators formally incorporated in 1943 and are headquartered today in Colorado Springs.

28th April 1960 … Leaders of the one hundredth General Assembly of the Southern Presbyterian Church pass a resolution declaring that sexual relations within marriage without intentions of procreation is not sinful.

27th April 1775 … Death of Peter Bohler, the German Moravian missionary who introduced John Wesley to personal  spiritual conversion and self-surrendering  Christian Faith. Bohler’s positive, assuring faith made a permanent mark on Wesley’s theology and has characterised Methodism ever since.

26th April 1992 … Worshippers celebrate Russian Orthodox Easter in Moscow for the first time in seventy-four years.

25th April 2014… this is the latest day in the Spring (NH), Autumn (S/H) on which Easter can fall. (Easter is determined by the Paschal full moon, which can occur as early as March 21.) Easter has fallen on April 25 only three times during the last three centuries: 1734, 1886, and 1943. It will not occur on April 25 again until 2038

24th April 1576 … Birth of Vincent de Paul, Catholic clergyman and philanthropist who devoted himself to the poor and founded the missionary order of Lazarists (1625) and the Sisters of Charity (1632). Vincent helped to ransom more than one thousand Christian slaves in Northern Africa. He was canonised in 1737 by Clement XII.

23rd April 1619 … The Synod of Dort passes a five point summary of Calvinist doctrine, which asserts (1) the total depravity of man; (2)unconditional election; (3) limited atonement; (4) the irresistibility of grace; and (5) the final perseverance of the saints. This summary has come to be known by the acronym TULIP.

22nd April 1864 … Bronze two-cent pieces are imprinted with the words “In God We Trust,” making them the first American coins to carry the motto. The motto is designed to remind the Union that the resolution of the American Civil War is in God’s hands.

21st April 1142 … Death of Peter Abelard, French Scholastic philosopher, theologian, and educator. Abelard also wrote the hymn ” O What Their Joy and Their Glory Must Be.”

20th April 1952 … Three years after the 1949 revolution that established the People’s Republic of China, evangelical leader Watchman Nee is arrested by the Chinese government and imprisoned for “corrupt business practices.” Nee spends nearly all of his last twenty years in prison.

19th April 526 … Justinian I is crowned Roman emperor in Constantinople’s magnificent cathedral, the Santa Sophia. Attempting to restore political and religious unity in the eastern and western empires, Justinian ruthlessly attacks paganism and heretics and creates the Code of Justinian.

18th April  1521 … Two days after his arrival at the Diet of Worms, Martin Luther defends his doctrines and refuses to recant his teachings. When negotiations over the next few days fail to reach a compromise, Luther is condemned by the council.

17th April 1492 … Spain’s King Ferdinand and Queen Isabella give Christopher Columbus a commission to seek a westward ocean passage to Asia. Columbus saw himself as a new and true “christopher” (Christ-bearer) who would carry Christ across the oceans to a people who had not heard the gospel.

16th April 1922 … Belvin W. Maynard, an ordained Baptist minister known as “the flying parson,” delivers the first sermon preached from an airplane by radio.

15th April 1452 … Birth of Leonardo da Vinci, Italian Renaissance artist, scientist, and inventor. Among his more memorable paintings are The Last Supper (1498) and Mona Lisa (1503).

14th April 1940 … English Bible expositor Arthur W. Pink declares in a letter, “Nothing is too great and nothing is too small to commit into the hands of the Lord.”

13th April 1742 … George Frideric Handel’s oratorio Messiah is first performed in Dublin, Ireland , as an oratorio for Lent (rather than Advent, as it is today).

12th April 1882 … The Evangelical Reformed Church in Northwest Germany is created by royal decree when the king of Prussia orders the 124 reformed congregations scattered throughout the area (then known as the Province of Hanover) to become incorporated as an independent territorial church.

11th April 1836 … George Muller, a leader of the Plymouth Brethren, opens his famous orphanage on Wilson Street in Bristol, England. By 1875 his ministry provided care for more than two thousand children. As a preacher at Ebenezer Chapel, Mueller believed that material needs could be supplied through prayer alone; thus he abolished pew rents and refused a salary.

10th April 428 … Nestorius is consecrated as bishop of Constantinople. When Nestorius attacked the use of the word theotokos (God-bearer) to describe Mary, and suggested christotokos (Christ-bearer) instead, he was branded a heretic.

9th April 1945 … Dietrich Bonhoeffer, German Lutheran pastor and theologian is martyred by the Nazis as the result of his involvement in a plot to assassinate Adolf Hitler.

8th April 1857 … A small group of Dutch immigrants, meeting in Zeeland, Michigan, organises the Christian Reformed Church.

7th April 1628 … Jonas Michaelius, the first minister of the Dutch Reformed Church to come to America, arrives in New Amsterdam (now New York City).

6th April 1735 … The first Moravians from Europe – ten members of the Unitas Fratrum – arrive in Savannah, Georgia, by invitation of governor James Oglethorpe.

5th April 1953 … President Dwight D. Eisenhower inaugurates the Presidential Prayer Breakfast (later called the National Prayer Breakfast). In 1956 Eisenhower signed an act making “In God We Trust” the national motto.

4th April 1507 … Martin Luther is ordained as a priest in Erfurt, Germany, one year after being consecrated as a monk in the Augustinian order.

3rd April 1851 … Irish-born Catholic bishop John J. Hughes becomes New York’s first archbishop, serving until his death in 1864.

2nd April 1524 … Ulrich Zwingli; Swiss reformer and former Catholic priest publicly celebrates his marriage (at the age of 40) to Anna Meyer (nee Reinhard) in the Zurich Cathedral. Their union lasts seven years, until Zwingli’s death in the Battle of Kappel in 1531.

1st April 1854 … Birth of Augustine Tolton, American Catholic leader and the first black American to be ordained as a Roman Catholic priest (1886).

31st March 1820 … The first group of American Protestant missionaries arrives in the Sandwich Islands (now Hawaii).

30th March 1871 … The Boston University School of Theology, the first theological school to admit women as students, is formed by a  merger of the Boston Theological Seminary and Boston University.

29th March 1788 … Death of Charles Wesley, co-founder of Methodism. In his lifetime Wesley penned over 8,000 hymns.

28th March 1646 … Baptists hold their first recorded meeting, in Boston.

27th March 1667 … English Puritan poet John Milton publishes Paradise Lost, an epic-length poem about humanity’s creation and fall.

26th March 1833 … Birth of Greek ecclesiastic and scholar Philotheos Bryennios. In 1873 he discovered an early manuscript of the Didache (a second-century manual of Christian discipline, now numbered among the writings of the apostolic fathers).

25th March 1906 … Birth of Dawson Trotman, American Bapstist youth ministry pioneer and founder of the Navigators, a youth-centered discipling ministry.

24th March 1818 … American statesman Henry Clay declares in the House of Representatives,”All religions united with government are more or less inimical to liberty. All separated from government are compatible with liberty”.

23rd March 1729 … First performance of Johann Sebastian Bach’s “St. Matthew Passion”, in Leipzig, Germany. Today, the oratorio is considered one of the most sublime masterpieces in Western music.

22nd March (ca.) 325 … The Council of Nicaea decided that Easter would be observed on the first Sunday following the first full moon after the spring equinox (March 21). This reckoning means that Easter, in any given year, will not occur earlier than March 22 nor later than April 25.

21st March 1685 … Birth of Johann Sebastian Bach, German Lutheran composer and musical genius. Nearly three-quarters of his one thousand compositions were written for use in Christian worship.

20th March 1747 … Colonial American missionary David Brainerd ends his work among the Indians of New England due to his deteriorating health from tuberculosis.

19th March 1944 … German Lutheran theologian and Nazi martyr Dietrich Bonhoeffer writes in a letter from prison. “We can have abundant life, even though many wishes remain unfulfilled”

18th March 1789 … Birth of British hymnist Charlotte Elliott. Though an invalid during her last fifty years. Elliott penned 150 hymns, of which the best known is “Just as I am”.

17th March 1856 … Ex-slave Amanda Smith, renowned evangelist and missionary, is converted. She later dedicates her life toGod’s service at the Green Street Methodist Episcopal Church in New York and travels to England, Scotland, Liberia and India

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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